History in Pictures


Letter Writer from Naples in 1870
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The famous statue of Emperor Augustus, recreated in color. Roman sculpture was not polished white marble, as so often depicted in film, but very colorful and vibrant. To the Romans, leaving a marble statue unpainted would feel lifeless and incomplete. In recent decades, the use of microscopic scanning has detected traces of paint that remain on many statues, allowing artists to digitally recreate how they originally appeared.
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  1. Jimmy Armstrong aka The Dwarf Clown at Clyde Beatty Circus in Palisades, New Jersey. From photographer Bruce Davidson’s series ‘Circus’.

“He was standing alone outside the tent smoking a cigarette,” Davidson upon seeing Armstrong for the first time. Dressed in a tux and a top hat he held a small bouquet of paper flowers, and “stood there pensively in the privacy of his inner thoughts.”

“He seemed to know that it was the inner moment I was drawn to and not his clown face or physical appearance. We became friends, although we seldom spoke to one another.”

“I found something in Jimmy that was more than loneliness, it was a story about surviving” - Bruce Davidson.

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Children in London celebrate Christmas in an underground bomb shelter, December 25, 1940.
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Grocery Shopping in the 1960’s

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Photograph of a Smiling Lady Taken 174 Years Ago

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Llama in Time Square 1957

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Pedestrians look through a restaurant window to watch a cook prepare a pot of spaghetti in New York City 1937

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New York City Subway 1941

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Thank you for posting these!! Most interesting!!! :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

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Phone booth stuffing in the 1950’s .

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The Basement Bar
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It’s incredible to think that in just 60 years, Japan managed to rebuild itself to become the second largest economy behind the U.S. Since 1945, Tokyo was napalmed and large parts of the city was built on wood, making it easier for the fire to spread, even beyond the Tokyo suburbs.
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Roman bird-shaped glass vessels were used as perfume bottles. The liquid was sealed inside the vessels and the tip of the tail had to be broken to remove the perfume. The one in the bottom picture (dated to the 1st century CE) is still intact and filled with the scented content.
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The Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire (Worn by soldier circa 1945). Made in 962 AD.

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The people cammed into the phone box reminded me of my younger days. I had a crippled friend who had a three wheeled invalid car; he regularly gave as many of us as could squeeze in lifts into town. On arrival we would spill out, laughing our heads off. Though not on the occasion we were stopped by the police and given a stiff warning. Ah, memories.

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@undine I can definitely relate to your story :joy: Back in the day we would hitchhike. Two girls would stick their thumbs out and when a car stopped we would all run out from behind the bushes and pile in the car. (I don’t know if I should have told this story​:eyes:).

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Innocent fun, those were the days. A time when people had a sense of humour; even the policemen who stopped us struggled not to laugh.

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There was a time when I would pick up hitchhikers. I was always driving somewhere long distance like to see my brother in Boulder, CO or parents in the Adirondacks. Coming back from CO once, I picked up these two people in blue-jean overalls (pretty confident I was in bell bottoms) out in the middle of nowhere Nebraska and it was 98F outside. The girl was 17 and her brother was 14. I had a 2 door Camaro, no AC, and they had been on the road for several days. They were on their way to an evangelical gathering in Nashville. With windows wide open (so I could breathe) we just managed to outrun a tornado at top speeds on route Interstate 80.

Those were the days.

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Ah, yes, brings back memories of tornado season in the Midwest. Exciting, and thankfully many good memories. All bets were off when the air turned colors and the animals were hushed in expectation, kids could get all Tom Sawyer.

With all of the severe weather anomalies now, I likely wouldn’t feel the same excitement, especially hearing of Joseph’s experiences.

Sounds like a sweet ride @justawhoaman.

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How did this guy get to wear the Crown Jewels?!

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The American soldiers name is Ivan Babcock… Apparently it was found in a Nazi vault in Germany. The Crown had been taken by the Nazis in Austria in 1938. After the war, it was returned to the Austrian government. It is currently in the museum of the Vienna Hofburg.

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Yeah, I grew up in SW Ohio and as a child experienced a few memorable swirls. If you have horses, they know before you do and they try to tell you to prepare - they are trying not to freak out but on high alert. I remember standing in the back yard once, historical house (1848) with trees to match, knowing that if that bloody funnel turned, we had the basement but really didn’t want to deal with the aftermath.

When I returned from undergraduate school to teach in Mariemont (Cincinnati), I would go home weekends to be with my parents; help my dad, fix fences, garden and cook with my mother. On the way home one weekend, up 271 to 275… traveling with my airedale (the kind you explain that she is there to protect me- pet at your own risk) I couldn’t understand why there were air-raid sirens as I left Cincinnati. I was on my way home (meaning- who was going to stop me?) Just as I could see the signs for the crossroad from going north on one interstate to another, I see the purple then green sky and think " oh BLEEP!!!" I watched as the black funnel formed, moved down into the open areas to the west (I had now pulled my car off the highway and was in shock that people were driving by - WHO KNEW which way it would turn?), passed over a barn lifting the metal roof far into the sky and then letting it float back to earth like an 11x17 brochure paper cover… out into the field. The black funnel moved northeast, rising and then landing back down to another cloud of debris.

When I crossed the road where I had observed the barn disintegration, I passed a Volkswagen bug that looked like it had been used as a basket ball, and a semi-truck pulling a steel coil had been dragged sideways about 50 yards into a muddy field - tracks told the story. The entire area was littered with what looked like sawdust: barn remnants.

This tornado went on with a series of ups and downs to eventually destroy Xenia, Ohio. Made national news. Dad was still practicing and had stories of people seen in radiology that made for other chapters in a tornado-story book.

Sorry to corrupt the thread- just couldn’t help myself.

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Thanks for the vivid description, I could see it all! My experiences were mostly from a distance but sometimes up close and scary.

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I remember those sirens in Cincinnati, voices on the radio telling us to go to the (I think it was southwest) corner of the basement, and the sky turned green and all the birds and insects were still. Eerie.

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Coney Island, New York, 1905. Colorized by Dana Keller.
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World War II propaganda posters in Port Washington, New York, 1942.
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Romanov sisters, Grand Duchesses Maria, Olga, Anastasia, and Tatiana, 1910. Colorized by Dana Keller.
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Baseball legend “Babe” Ruth, (ca. 1920), the year he joined the New York Yankees. Colorized by Dana Keller.
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College students pile into a Volkswagen Beetle, 1965.

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Spectators watch a horse diving act at an unspecified location
( perhaps Pueblo , Colorado ) on July 4 , 1905 .

Horse diving was a popular spectacle through much of the 19th century , with horses
( with or without a person onboard )
would jump from towers into a pool of water from heights as great as 60 feet.C.E.
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Ronald Reagan poses at the University of Southern California in 1940. He was chosen as an example of the ideal male body by the school’s fine arts department.
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Only this cute little monument remains. Chamberlain Square, Birmingham
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Cheers set from the actors point of view.
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Actress Lucille Ball and husband Desi Arnaz with children Desi Jr.
and Lucie in front of their Palm Springs home.
Palm Springs, California
Date: 1954
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Brooklyn “Brookie” Supreme was a red roan Belgian stallion noted for his extreme size. Although disputed, the horse may be the world record holder for largest horse and was designated the world’s heaviest horse. He stood 19.2 hands tall and weighed 3,200 lb with a girth of 10 ft 2 in
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In 1935, there was a well-known local fortune teller in Chinatown named Charlie Chan. Many people came to Chinatown to ask Charlie Chan for fortune-telling.
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1938 Chinese herbalist in Chinatown
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Chinatown in Los Angeles has a 150-year history. This is what Old Chinatown looked like in 1938. Old Chinatown is located in the old downtown of Los Angeles, just facing the oldest road in Los Angeles (now called the “Old Mexico District”). But old Chinatown is gone. In 1941, the old Chinatown was demolished by the government, and later the Los Angeles Railway Station was built (it is still the Union Station of the Los Angeles Railway Station). Old Chinatown is very crowded and dense, with various Chinese restaurants, shops, bars, and casinos.

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Recruits in training for war. During World War II, Miami Beach
transformed from a tourist haven to a military training ground.
Tens of thousands of troops passed through South Florida to
prepare for combat.
Miami Beach, Florida
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Gettysburg, 1913
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Famous jazz photograph called “A Great Day
in Harlem.”
Harlem, New York City, New York
Date: August 12, 1958
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Pacific Highway through a
Washington red-cedar stump, 20-feet in diameter.
Seattle, Washington
Date: 1920

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Was the Charlie Chan THE Charlie Chan?

Does anyone here think that Ronnie had the ideal male body?

The horse and rider jumping from that height
into a pool🙀

The size of the Belgian Roan😳!

Fantastic photos you’re digging up!

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Indiana school children’s class in gun safety, 1956.
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In the 1920s, Belgian coal miners would ride up together on a crowded elevator after a tough day underground. Covered in coal dust, their tired faces showed the challenges they faced.
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First Lady of the United States Jacqueline Kennedy sits with her children on Christmas morning in 1962.
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Fins, fins and more fins! Get your fins here!
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1950’s Jam Session
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First Ladies (left to right) Nancy Reagan, Lady Bird Johnson, Hillary Clinton, Rosalyn Carter, Betty Ford, and Barara Bush at the National Garden Gala: A Tribute to America’s First Ladies. This picture was taken one week before the death of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
Washington, D.C.
Date: May 11, 1994
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Geronimo’s final band pictured in front of the train car taking them to prison in Florida. Geronimo is in the front row, third from the right. Immediately to his left is Chief Naiche. In the back row, third from the right is Lozen, the famous woman warrior. This is the only known photograph of her.
Photo: September 10, 1889
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A glimpse of Marblehead Harbor, 17 miles northeast of Boston. It is
considered the birthplace of the Continental Navy, the forerunner
of the United States Navy, and of United States Marine Corps
Aviation.
Marblehead, Massachusetts
Date: c. 1906
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A young Mitt Romney looking over the New York World’s Fair with
his father, George W. Romney, at that time Governor of Michigan.
New York City, New York (Flushing Meadows-Corona Park)
Date: 1964
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Al and Mae Capone stand on the dock at their home on Palm
Island with their granddaughters one month before his death.
Miami Beach, Florida
Date: December 25, 1946
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Al Capone 1
“THIS IS NOT A NEAT GIRL’S HALL BEDROOM. It is a prison cell occupied by a convicted burglar.” Photo: New York Tribune, June 1903

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THE LIVING LIBERTY BELL, composed of 25,000 officers and men in
training at Camp Dix. This remarkable photograph was taken on
the afternoon of June 20, when the entire cantonment personnel
was assembled on the drill field in historic formation to which had
been applied, with mathematical precision, the Laws of
Perspective. These are the bell’s dimensions in feet: Length of
Beam at Top, 368, Width of Bell at Bottom, 64, Length of Each Bolt,
395, Width of Beam, Top to Bottom, 435, Total Length, Top to
Bottom, 580. Due to the perspective, there are more than eleven
times as many men in the beam as in the bell itself. (Wikipedia)
Wrightstown, New Jersey
Date: July 21, 1918
Photo: The New York Times/Arthur S. Mole & John D. Thoma
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Selling War Bonds. Tyndall Field. 1943.
Duke University Library.


It’s a bad seed
Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. at age ten. (Joe)
Claymont, Delaware
Date: 1953
Photo: Office of United States Senator Joe Biden (D – Delaware)
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Nancy Pelosi, front and center with her family and father, Baltimore
Mayor Thomas D’Alesandro, Jr.
Baltimore, Maryland
Date: c. 1945
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Rene Carpenter, with her children at a press conference. She was the last surviving member of the Astronaut Wives Club. She passed away July 24, 2020.
Coco Beach, Florida
Date: May 26, 1962
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Scrabble inventor Alfred Butts (L) and promoter
James Brunot posed with oversized game.
Rhinebeck, New York?
Date: November 1953
Photo: Arthur Rothstein for Look Magazine/Shorpy
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Safety standards in the 1960s were something else

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Colorized circa 1898 photo of Dr. Hurt & Co. with a group of hunting hounds in Boonville, Missouri. Photo by Maximilian E. Schmidt. Restoration and colorization by LongView HD. Repository: The State Historical Society of Missouri Photograph Collection.

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A colorized photograph of a Washington D.C. car crash in 1921

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Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck playing cards on the set of Roman Holiday, 1953. Colorized by Lorna Clark.
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An 1875 photograph of the interior of the ornate and well-appointed main salon on a Mississippi River steamboat.

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